Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative
Brings people and resources together
For strategic advantage, strengthening our collective impact
On the lasting protection of our natural world.

(337) 266-8816
GCP LCC Coordinator
  • An overarching priority of Gulf Coast Prairie LCC is improving hydrologic conditions, including water quality, quantity, and flow patterns. Changes to hydrology have damaged many prime habitats. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  • The wintering grounds of the northern pintail, a Gulf Coast Prairie LCC focal species, include estuaries in Texas and Louisiana. It was once North America's most abundant duck. Photo courtesy Ducks Unlimited

  • The American oyster, a Gulf Coast Prairie LCC focal species, lives in tidal areas such as Louisiana’s coastal estuaries. Many other species use oyster reefs for foraging and shelter. Photo courtesy Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries

  • Gulf Coast Prairie LCC partners are protecting and restoring prairie grasslands of the Southern Great Plains.

  • The official state fish of Texas and a popular sportfish, the Guadalupe bass is found only in that state. It is a Gulf Coast Prairie LCC focal species. Photo courtesy Texas Parks and Wildlife Department © 2006

  • The endangered black-capped vireo, a Gulf Coast Prairie LCC focal species, nests in the Edwards Plateau in central Texas and winters in western Mexico. Photo courtesy Fish and Wildlife Service

  • Williams Prairie is one of 14 prairie grassland preserves west of the Houston, Texas, managed by the Katy Prairie Conservancy.

  • Birders flock to south Texas for some of the best bird-watching in the world. Colorful songbirds, such as the green jay, are among the main attractions. Photo courtesy Rich Kostecke of The Nature Conservancy

  • An overarching priority of Gulf Coast Prairie LCC is protecting and restoring Gulf of Mexico coastal habitats and wildlife. Photo courtesy Texas Parks and Wildlife Department © 2006

  • The brown pelican, a Gulf Coast Prairie LCC focal species, is making a comeback throughout the Gulf of Mexico and other coastal areas of the South and West. Photo courtesy Texas Parks and Wildlife Department © 2013

The Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative was established in 2011 and is based out of Lafayette, Louisiana. It is part of a network of 22 similar partnerships throughout the United States and our neighboring countries. LCCs develop the science partners need to conserve and manage natural and cultural resources, particularly GIS technology and climate science.

LCC boundaries are determined by landscape geography and ecology, not government jurisdictions or organizational parameters. Gulf Coast Prairie LCC covers about 120 million acres, including areas within five states in the south-central United States (Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas) and portions of three states in northeastern Mexico (Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas).

The majority of the LCC area is in eastern… (Read more)

Texas, central Oklahoma, and northeastern Mexico, but it also includes the western coast of the Gulf of Mexico in Mexico north-eastward through Louisiana and Mississippi, as well as a small part of south-central Kansas.

Prime habitats within the area covered by the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative range from tallgrass prairie and semi-desert shrublands, to oak hardwood and pine forests, to tidal wetlands and barrier islands. Several major waterways lace through the LCC area, including the lower Rio Grande, Guadalupe, Brazos, Trinity, Nueces, Arkansas, Red, San Antonio, and Mississippi Rivers, as well as some of our continent’s most wildlife-rich coastal wetlands.

These waterways not only serve as a lifeline for wildlife, they also contribute significantly to our economic prosperity because of their importance to tourism and outdoor recreation, commercial fishing, and shipping and transportation. The area’s water resources also provide groundwater supplies for some of our fastest-growing population centers.

More than 500 kinds of birds and 300 butterfly species can be found within the Gulf Coast Prairie landscape, including the northern bobwhite, eastern meadowlark, black-capped vireo, and monarch butterfly. Other well-known species include the blue crab, Guadalupe bass, diamondback terrapin, horned lizard, ocelot, ornate turtle, redfish, and spotted skunk.