Conservation Partners connecting working lands conservation from the Gulf of Mexico to the High Plains with the vision of a sustainable landscape of natural resources resilient to the threats and stressors associated with our changing world.

(903) 570-9626
Conservation Coordinator 

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  • Edwards Plateau

    The ecology of central Texas’ Edwards Plateau is rapidly changing, prompting Conservation partners to improve conservation efforts. The area hosts several Southern Great Plains focal species.

  • Black-Capped Vireo

    The previously endangered black-capped vireo, nests in the Edwards Plateau in central Texas and winters in western Mexico. Photo courtesy Fish and Wildlife Service

  • Texas Horned Lizard

    The Texas horned lizard, a protected species in Texas and Oklahoma, is found in arid habitats throughout the south-central U.S. and northern Mexico.

  • Aplomado Falcon

    A captive breeding and reintroduction effort in the grasslands of south Texas is helping to recover the endangered Aplomado falcon. Photo courtesy Texas Parks and Wildlife Department © 2013

  • Saline Prairie in east Texas

    Saline prairie in east Texas Courtesy of Toby Gray

  • TX Waterway

    An overarching priority of Southern Great Plains is improving hydrologic conditions, including water quality, quantity, and flow patterns. Changes to hydrology have damaged many prime habitats. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  • Diamondback Terrapin

    The diamondback terrapin, a Southern Great Plains focal species, is native to coastal saltmarsh, estuaries, and tidal creeks along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Coasts. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

  • Golden-cheeked Warbler

    The endangered golden-cheeked warbler, breeds in central Texas. Conservation partners are working to protect juniper and oak woodlands to help the warbler and other songbirds. Photo courtesy Fish and Wildlife Service

  • Enchanted Rock

    The Enchanted Rock area of Texas, referring to an enormous pink granite dome, is situated in the hill country of Texas, northwest of Austin, amid grasslands and shrublands.

  • Whooping Cranes

    The Gulf Coast of Texas is an important wintering area for the endangered whooping crane. It has rebounded from only 21 birds in the wild in the 1940s to around 600 today. Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Southern Great Plains (SGP) conservation partnerships have roots in the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC), with goals to foster, share, and  develop the science needed by partners to conserve and manage natural and cultural resources, particularly through  GIS technology and climate science.

The original partnership included over 120 million acres, including areas within five states (Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas) in the south-central United States and portions of three states in northeastern Mexico (Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas).

The majority of the area is in eastern Texas, central Oklahoma, and northeastern Mexico, but it also includes the western coast of the Gulf of Mexico from Mexico north-eastward through Louisiana and Mississippi, as well as a small part of south-central Kansas.

Prime habitats within our shared interests in conservation range from tallgrass prairie and semi-desert shrublands, to oak hardwood and pine forests, to tidal wetlands and barrier islands.  Several major waterways lace through our SGP area, including the lower Rio Grande, Guadalupe, Brazos, Trinity, Nueces, Arkansas, Red, San Antonio, and Mississippi Rivers, as well as some of our continent’s most wildlife-rich coastal wetlands.

These waterways not only serve as a lifeline for wildlife, they also contribute significantly to our economic prosperity because of their importance to tourism and outdoor recreation, commercial fishing, and shipping and transportation. The area’s water resources also provide groundwater supplies for some of our fastest-growing population centers.

More than 500 kinds of birds and 300 butterfly species can be found within the Southern Great Plains landscape, including the northern bobwhite, eastern meadowlark, black-capped vireo, and monarch butterfly. Other well-known species include the blue crab, Guadalupe bass, diamondback terrapin, horned lizard, ocelot, ornate turtle, redfish, and spotted skunk.